Deprecated: Assigning the return value of new by reference is deprecated in /home/content/31/8254531/html/occupywallstreetstories/wp-content/plugins/pages-posts/functions.php on line 151

Deprecated: Assigning the return value of new by reference is deprecated in /home/content/31/8254531/html/occupywallstreetstories/wp-content/plugins/pages-posts/functions.php on line 172

Deprecated: Assigning the return value of new by reference is deprecated in /home/content/31/8254531/html/occupywallstreetstories/wp-content/plugins/pages-posts/functions.php on line 195

Deprecated: Assigning the return value of new by reference is deprecated in /home/content/31/8254531/html/occupywallstreetstories/wp-content/plugins/pages-posts/functions.php on line 216
PHOTOS: Istanbul portrayed by Michele Sibiloni | Occupied Stories

Categorized | Resistanbul, Stories

PHOTOS: Istanbul portrayed by Michele Sibiloni

PHOTOS: Istanbul portrayed by Michele Sibiloni
Share

Editor’s note: This is a condensed version of an interview published at  No Rhetorike. Visit the original for the full story.

Michele Sibiloni is an Italian photojournalist who covers East Africa and the Congo. He is currently based in Uganda where he is doing a long term project. He was in Italy for vacation and monitoring the Turkish protests since the beginning. After a couple of weeks he decided to go there, because it seemed to him like something that would not end in a few days. He knew that these protests were being super-covered, so he was ready to do some personal work also in case there was no assignment. Michele contacted the agency that he normally works with and filled a few days of work for them. Then he kept working for himself and tried to understand the situation and to find a story that could develop after the big news would be over. He says: “I actually find the current situation very interesting because of the stories of transition that these young Turks are living. They want to stand up no matter what, and that is something that I admire so much.”

Here you will find his pictures with comments by Michele about the situation where were taken and some of his reflections.

 

Voices XXIII: Michele Sibiloni. Italian photojournalist who shares his work and thoughts

Taksim Square from the building

Taksim Square from the building

This image has been taken from inside a big building in Taksim Square. People were walking in and out without asking permission from anyone, you could even go on the roof. Everyone was taking photos of the square and of each other. I felt something was not right; I thought, “This is a construction site and no one is controlling anything. People are walking around for no reason. Someone is playing the saxophone and a bunch of photographers are taking pictures.” At that point, I looked outside and wondered about the square. It was packed… the sun was setting, people sang together… there was a great atmosphere, a sense of unity. The question that came up immediately in my mind was, “How long is this going to last?” Not long, I thought.

 

Besiktas Çarsi soccer supporters reached Taksim

Besiktas Çarsi soccer supporters reached Taksim

After I was in the building, I wandered around the square, and suddenly fireworks started. It was nice, all those soccer fans with those red lights–people seemed to appreciate that. There was a lot of drinking; it was kind of a party atmosphere. Then I thought to myself, I don’t think Prime Minister Erdogan will allow this kind of atmosphere in Taksim Square for long.

 

A pharmacist in Gazi neighborhood looking outside the shop during a street battle

A pharmacist in Gazi neighborhood looking outside the shop during a street battle

This image has been taken in Gazi, a Kurdish neighborhood where very often people are rioting against police. People of every age are there, from young boys to old men; women band together against the common enemy, the police. The protesters were happy to have so many journalists around. The general feeling was that those people were used to doing what they did: very organized with cars ready in case of injured people, a pharmacist with his shop open, wearing swimming goggles and a mask, ready to help out. In the meantime, very close to the spot, life goes on normally inside a bar and cafe. There is some concert in a bar and people are doing normal things, while others are fighting in the street–very unusual.

 

Police getting teargas back from protestors in Taksim

Police getting teargas back from protestors in Taksim

 

 

 

People carrying  a guy who got shot in the head to the hospital 

People carrying  a guy who got shot in the head to the hospital

 

These guys are carrying a guy who got a teargas canister or plastic bullet straight in his head; he had a hole and the blood was gushing out, they were keeping a piece of clothes on his head to stop the bleeding. I’m not sure but think he is one of the few who passed out. While i was shooting the picture, I thought that I should be very careful, because when you work in such a situation, everyone is a target.

 

A protester throwing teargas back at Police in a street next to Gezi Park

A protester throwing teargas back at Police in a street next to Gezi Park

A guy was throwing teargas back at police. In one of the corners where many people got injured, I was protecting myself behind a truck, but I was kind of limited and i did not want to move too much because I had previously seen the guy getting hit in the head.

 

Exhausted police resting in Taksim after a battle in the morning.
(six police committed suicide since the protest started, according to the Turkish media)

Exhausted police resting in Taksim after a battle in the morning.

Police officers were resting in Taksim Square while the battle stopped for a while. I was surprised that they were resting there; some of them looked shocked, tired exhausted, and looked like they felt sorry for a second. People were not angry at them. Most of the protesters were pacifists; most of them were not fighting at all.

For those readers who don’t know, yesterday an interview with #durankadin was published

Michele Sibiloni’s website is coming soon; you can find his contact information here.

Click here for the Occupy Gezi Facebook page.

Follow the blog updates on Facebook.

Follow the blog updates on Twitter.

-Gabriel Yacubovich Japkin-

Share

Leave a Reply